'Clones' Townlands
(And their meanings)
Home
Townlands
Immigration
St Tierneys
Records
Memoirs
Photos
Contact me
 

Ireland is sub-divided in a unique way; provinces into counties, counties into baronies, baronies into parishes, and parishes into townlands.

The townland is a unique feature of the Irish landscape and is one of the most ancient divisions in the country. The origins of the townland remains obscure but they are undoubtedly of great antiquity. They existed long before the parishes and counties and were eventually written down in anglicised form as they sounded to English court scribes.

Townlands orginally consisted of a number of sub-divisions such as gneeves and ploughlands but they are now recognised as the smallest administrative division in the country. There are more than 64,000 townlands in Ireland (9700 in Ulster) and great variations are evident in townland sizes due to the fact that their shapes and sizes are related to local topography and farming practices. Loosely related to the ancient Gaelic "Bally betagh", and to other medieval land divisions such as ploughlands and quarters, townlands can vary enormously in size, from a single acre or less to several thousand acres.

 
Local Fermanagh Genealogist and Townland campaigner Brian Gallagher,explains the importance of Townlands and why they should be kept.

They were used as the smallest geographical unit in both Tithe Survey and Griffith's, as well as census returns, and are still in use today. Anything from 5 to 30 townlands may be grouped together to form a civil parish. Most Roman Catholic parishes cover parts of more than one civil parish.

The townland name may originally have referred to an easily identifiable feature of the landscape or a botanical feature such as Rocktown Townland of the Rock, Mullaghboy Yellow hilltop, Killyberry Wood of the place of the stakes/spits, Broagh Bank/brink and Drumlamph Ridge of the marsh-mallows/elm trees The social customs or history of the people who have lived in a particular place can also be reflected in the name of the townland.

Often these names are the only records which survive of the families who held the land in pre-plantation times. Bally or Baile (both meaning settlement) are usually compounded with personal or family names and examples can be found all over Ireland including such names as Ballymacpeake Macpeakes townland, and Tamniaran OHerrerans field Many townlands throughout Ireland took their names from early habitation sites, both ecclesiastical and secular, and these include Rath (meaning fortification), Dun (meaning fort) or Chill (meaning church). It is unclear where Lemnaroy The red horses leap got its name.

If you are searching for your family anywhere in Ireland, knowing the Townland they came from is one of the best ways of tracing them. Knowing the Barony, Parish, etc will also be of great help to you, since many townlands share the same name - for example there are 47 Townlands named Dromore and 56 Kilmores.

 

The Northern Ireland Place-Name Project, established in 1987, researches the origin and meaning of the place-names of Northern Ireland.

Searching through their databases I have managed to find all the townlands in Clones parish,and to translate their meanings. A list of these townlands can be seen below.

 

Townland name
Translation
Aghaboy
Yellow Field
Aghadrumsee and Killygorman
Field of the fairy ridge
Agharoosky
Field of the Marsh
Aghnachuill
Field of the wood
Aghnashammer
Field of the shamrocks
Annachullion Glebe
Marsh of the hollow
Annaghard
High moor
Annaghilly North
Marsh of the wood
Annaghilly South
Marsh of the wood
Annaghkeel
narrow moor of Marsh
Annaghlee
Marsh of the calf
Annaghmartin
Martin's Marsh
Annagolgan
Ford of the Colgans
Annahervy
Marsh of the division
Annahone
Owen's Marsh
Annashanco
Marsh of the old hollow
Annynanum

Arnot's Grove
Calmadan's river
Bosallagh
dirty booth or hut
Bruscarnagh
rubbish, ground encumbered with rubb
Bunlougher
rushy bottom
Bunmichael
Michael's bottom
Bunnablaneybane
base of the white creek
Carneyhome
Kearney's strath
Carnmore
Great Carn
Clahernagh
A Stony place
Cloghmore
Great stone
Clonagun
Meadow the hounds
Clonatty
Atty's lawn or meadow
Cloncorr
Meadow of Cranes or Herons
Clonfad
Long Lawn or Meadow
Clonfeile
Lawn of the hospitality
Clonmackan
Parsnip Meadow
Clontivrin

Coolnalong
Back of the ships
Coolnamarrow
Back hill of the dead men
Corbane
White Round Hill
Cordoolagh
Round hill of the black lough
Corflugh
Wet round hill
Corlaghaloon
Round hill of Loane's lake
Cornaclare or Johnstown

Cornacreeve
Round hill of the bush
Cornamramurry
Round hill of the dead woman
Cornamucklagh
Round hill of the Piggeries
Corraghy
Round hill of the Field
Corragunt
Closed Weir
Corraleek
Round hill of the stone
Corranny
Anny's round hill
Corrardaghy
Round hill of the high Field
Corrinshigo
Round hill of the ash
Cortaher
Round hill of the battle
Cortrasna
Cross Hill
Crockada
The hill between two Marshy
Crockarevan
Revan's hill
Crockawaddy Glebe
the dog's hill
Crocknaboghil
Hill of the boys
Crocknagross
Hill of the crosses
Crocknakelly Glebe
Hill of the Hag
Cromaghy
Sloping Field
Deer Park

Dernabacky
Oak Wood of the cripple
Dernaglug and Drumaa

Derryard
High Oak wood
Derrycree
Oak Wood of the cattle
Derrygannon
Gannons oak wood
Derrygelly
Oak Wood of O'Kellys
Derryheanlisk
Oak Wood of the old fort
Derryloo
Looee's Oak wood
Derrymeen
Samll Derry or oak grove
Derrynacloy
Oak Wood of the stone
Derrynawilt East
Oak Wood of the wether
Derrynawilt West
Oak Wood of the locks of hair
Derryneese
Angus's Oak wood
Derryvolan
Mullans oak wood
Doon and Eshcleagh

Dresternan
Brambly Place
Drumaa and Dernaglug

Drumacrittin
The Ridge of the little hump
Drumady
Long Ridge
Drumbealimy
Belimy's ridge
Drumbinnisk
Ridge of the melody
Drumbrughas
the Ridge of the farm-house
Drumcru
Ridge of the blood
Drumerheeve
Ridge of the side
Drumerwinter
Ridge of the tribe
Drumgoast
Ridge of the sprite
Drumguiff

Drumharriff
The Ridge of the bull
Drummans Glebe
Small ridges
Drumrainy
the Ridge of the ferns
Drumshancorick
Ridge of the old meeting
Drumsoo
Ridge of the strawberries
Drumswords
Ridge of the diligence
Drumyarkin
O'Harkin's drum or hill-ridge
Errasallagh
Dirty division
Ervey
A division
Eshcleagh and Doon

Eshekerin
Kerrin's rough pasture
Eshnadarragh
Bottom land of the oak
Eshnadeelada
Bottom of the saddle
Eshywulligan
O'Mulligan's low lying land
Feagh
A woody place
Follum Big
Empty, hollow
Galbally
Englishtown
Golan
A little fork
Gorteen
Little Field
Gortindarragh
Field of the oak
Gortinure
Field of the yew
Gowny
Calves: a calf resort
Greaghacapple
Rough pasturage of the horse
Greaghacholea
Greagh of the cow stake
Greaghaverrin

Greaghawarren
The Baron's mountain pasture
Greaghnagore
Greagh of the goats
Greaghnamoyle
Greagh of the hornless cows
Inver
The mouth of a river
Johnstown or Cornaclare

Killyfole
Killyfole
Killygorman and Aghadrumsee
Field of the fairy ridge
Killylacky
Wood of the hollow
Killylifferbane Glebe
Oliver's Wood (white)
Killylifferdoo
Oliver's Wood (black)
Killyvilly
Wood of the old tree
Kilridd
Wood of the scum
Kilroosky
Wood of the morass
Kimran

Knappagh
a knoll, hillock"
Knockavea
hill of the birch
Knockawaddy
hill of the dog
Knockmacaroony Glebe
Mackaroony's hill
Knocknalear
hill of the forks
Knocknalosset
hill of the lossets or well till
Knocks
The hills
Lacky
Place of flagstones
Lammy
A place of elms
Lannaght

Legacurry
Hollow of the moor
Liskilly
Fort of the wood
Lismacsheela
Fort of the son of Sheelah
Lisnamallard
Fort of the curses
Lisnavoe
Fort of the incursions
Lisnawesnagh

Lisrace
Fort of the Marsh
Lisroon
Rowan's Fort
Loughgare
short lough
Milligans
Little bald hills
Mount Darby

Mullaghbrady
Brady's Hill
Mullaghconnelly
Connolly's hilltop
Mullaghglass
Green hill
Mullanahinch
Top of the holm or inch
Mullans
Little flat hills
Mullanvaum
Top of the Maum or elevated pass
Mullavea Glebe
Summit of the birch
Mullycavan
Top of the hill
Mullynalughoge
Hill of the mice
Pottiagh
Place full of paits or holes
Rateen
Tin's fort
Rathkeevan
Keevan's fort
Rathmoran
MacMoran's fort
Rellan
MacMoran's fort
Rossbrick Glebe
Point of the badger
Rosslea
Grey wood or wooded height
Scribby
Furrow, trench
Shanaghy
Old field
Shannock
Young John
Spring Grove
Grove of the spring
Stralustrin
The river-holm of the burnt corn
Strananerriagh
Holm of the ploughmen
Summerhill

Tattinbarr
Tate of the top
Tattintonegan
Tate of the bottom
Tattygormican
O'Gormacan's tate
Tattymore
Great tate
Tattymorris
Morris's tate
Tattynacunnian
Tate of the rabbit
Tattynageeragh
Tate of the sheep
Tattynagolan
Tate of the fork
Tibberedoge Glebe
Little well
Tireevil
Land of the wheat
Tonity Bog
Bottom of the house
Tonitygorman
Bottom of Gorman's house
Tonnaghboy
Yellow mounds
Tonydrummallard
Bottom of the Ridge
Tully
A gentle hill
Uttony
Owney's breast


 

map

Video : Another meeting in support of our townlands.

This one at Stormont, with Brian Gallagher in attendance.

This map is of all the townlands in

Clones parish, Fermanagh.

Click image to enlarge

 

 

 

Home
Townlands
Immigration
St Tierneys
Records
Memoirs
Photos
Contact me
 
track hits